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Learning to Argue in Higher Education

Learning to Argue in Higher Education

By Edited by Richard Andrews, Edited by Sally Mitchell

    Learning to Argue in Higher Education promises to make a substantial contribution to the thinking about argument in rhetoric and composition.
    —John M. Trimbur, Worcester Polytechnical University

"Argument" is perhaps one of the most misunderstood terms in higher education, meaning different things in different disciplines. Yet on one thing most educators agree: it is almost impossible to attain success at the highest levels in the humanities, arts, social sciences, and other language-based disciplines without a command of argumentative skills. Learning to Argue in Higher Education...

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    Learning to Argue in Higher Education promises to make a substantial contribution to the thinking about argument in rhetoric and composition.
    —John M. Trimbur, Worcester Polytechnical University

"Argument" is perhaps one of the most misunderstood terms in higher education, meaning different things in different disciplines. Yet on one thing most educators agree: it is almost impossible to attain success at the highest levels in the humanities, arts, social sciences, and other language-based disciplines without a command of argumentative skills. Learning to Argue in Higher Education was written to allow for a cross-fertilization of ideas about argument between different disciplines and traditions, and to encourage conversation about their approaches to its teaching and learning.

This volume makes a significant contribution to the current thinking about argument, addressing why we teach argument in the first place, how it currently figures in teaching and learning, and how me might think about it in more productive ways. Covering everything from formal discussion in seminars to tutorials and written essays, these authors approach the problem from different angles: critical accounts of practice, classroom pedagogy, as well theoretical models of argument, students’ perspective on learning, and the dynamics involved in teaching and learning. The book represents a range of disciplines, including architecture, law, social science, work-based education, as well as writing and composition.

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Contents

Contents:
Introduction:
Learning to Argue in Higher Education, R. Andrews 1. Innocent Concepts? A Paradigmatic Approach to Argument, A. Eisenschitz 2. Rhetoric and Architecture, P. Medway 3. Blinded by the Enlightenment: Epistemological Constraints and Pedagogical Restraints in the Pursuit of "Critical" Thinking, D. Sweet & D. Swanson 4. Improving Argument by Parts, M. Riddle 5. A Workable Balance: Self and Sources in Argumentative Writing, N. Groom 6. "I Don't Have to Argue My Design-The Visual Speaks for Itself": A Case Study of Mediated Activity in an Introductory Mechanical Engineering Course, M. Mathison 7. "Context Cues Cognition": Writing, Rhetoric, and Legal Argumentation, P. Maharg 8. Eager Interpreters: Student Writers and the Art of Writing Research, C. Woods 9. Citation as an Argumentation Strategy in the Reflective Writing of Work-Based Learning Students, C. Costley & K. Doncaster 10. Teaching Writing Theory as Liberatory Practice: Helping Students Chart the Dangerous Waters of Academic Discourse Across Disciplines in Higher Education, C. Davidson 11. "Argument" as a Term in Talk About Student Writing, J. Giltrow 12. Putting Argument into the Mainstream, S. Mitchell