Composition, Pedagogy & the Scholarship of Teaching by Deborah Minter,
Composition, Pedagogy & the Scholarship of Teaching

Composition, Pedagogy & the Scholarship of Teaching

How do composition teachers document their teaching? What types of documentation work best? Teaching portfolios, course portfolios, philosophy statements, classroom observation? How can these materials provide essential testimony about our classrooms and our achievements, not just to ourselves and our colleagues but to faculty supervisors, tenure and promotion committees, deans, and provosts?

Documenting our work as teachers offers a rich and productive means for reflection, analysis, and self-assessment of professional progress. Composition, Pedagogy & the Scholarship of Teaching explains how...

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Full Description

How do composition teachers document their teaching? What types of documentation work best? Teaching portfolios, course portfolios, philosophy statements, classroom observation? How can these materials provide essential testimony about our classrooms and our achievements, not just to ourselves and our colleagues but to faculty supervisors, tenure and promotion committees, deans, and provosts?

Documenting our work as teachers offers a rich and productive means for reflection, analysis, and self-assessment of professional progress. Composition, Pedagogy & the Scholarship of Teaching explains how to create these kinds of teaching materials, while offering a sophisticated array of perspectives and materials for developing and maintaining them.

In this outstanding collection of essays and resources, tenured and tenure-track composition faculty, writing program administrators, and graduate students outline a variety of concrete strategies that make the teaching portfolio a powerful tool for

  • assessing professional strengths and weaknesses
  • reviewing programmatic and curricular questions
  • reflecting on individual professional development
  • meeting institutional goals and mandates
  • documenting teaching for professional review and job applications.

Best of all, the book is supplemented by Companion Resources: syllabi, course materials, and other kinds of information that are an intrinsic part of the professional development of practicing, college-level composition teachers. Not only can these examples serve as models for your own teaching documentation, they can also refine your notions of how best to represent your teaching practice as you become part of the discipline-wide discussion on documenting post-secondary teaching.

Contents

Acknowledgments
About the Website
Preface, Ann Ruggles Gere
Introduction: Why Document Postsecondary Teaching?, Deborah Minter and Amy M. Goodburn
Part 1: Practical Concerns in Documenting Teaching
1. Reconsidering and Reassessing Teaching Portfolios: Reflective and Rhetorical Functions
Camille Newton, Tracy Singer, Amy D’Antonio, Laura Bush, and Duane Roen
2. Looping and Linking Heuristics for Teacher Portfolio Development
Julie Robinson, Lisa Cahill, and Rochelle Rodrigo Blanchard.
Examples of Looping and Linking
3. Thinking and Writing Ethnographically for Annual Reviews and Promotion and Tenure Portfolios
Sara Robbins
Teching Documentation from Promotion File
4. Constructed Confessions: Creating a Teaching Self in the Job Search Portfolio
Peggy O’Neill
Teaching Documentation for Job Search
5. Teaching Statements and Teaching Selves
Ruth M. Mirtz
Teaching Philosophy Statements
6. Peer Observation as Collaborative Classroom Inquiry
Deborah Minter
Assignments and Sample Observation Materials
7. The Course Portfolio: Individual and Collective Possibilites
Amy M. Goodburn
Sample Course Narratives and Course Portfolios
Part II: Implications for Documenting Teaching: Assessment, Evaluation, and Reform
8. Beyond Course Evaluations: Representing Student Voice and Experience
Margaret K. Willard–Traub
Teaching Documentation for Job Search
9. The Medium and the Message: Developing Responsible Methods for Assessing Teaching Portfolios
Chris M. Anson and Deanna P. Dannels
10. Reading for Pedagogy: Negotiating the Complexities of Context from a Search Committee Chair’s Perspective
Donna LeCourt
11. The Ethics of Required Teaching Portfolios
Carrie Shively Leverenz
12. Building Community Through Reflection: Constructing and Reading Teaching Portfolios as a Method of Program Assessment
Ellen Schendel and Camille Newton
13. Working Together, Advancing Alone: The Problem of Representing collaboration in Teaching Portfolios
Stephen Fox
Teaching Documentation from Tenure File.
Works Cited
About the Contributors

Companion Resources

In these resources, volume contributors offer artifacts from their teaching lives to show how they have documented and represented their teaching in light of the commitments and methods they describe in the book. In most cases, the authors include extended discussion of these materials in their chapters. We appreciate their willingness to share their teaching lives so openly, and in this spirit we hope these artifacts will offer useful invitations and models for you to document your own teaching. Beyond supporting individual teachers in such work, we hope these artifacts will enrich current discussions of how to assess the intellectual work of teaching ethically and productively. With the exception of the electronic emergent teaching portfolio (chapter 2), all of the website material is in PDF format and is available for you to download. With calls to reclaim and revalue teaching in higher education proliferating, we look forward to the future conversations that this volume hopes to inspire.

Deborah Minter and Amy M. Goodburn

Chapter 2

Excerpts from electronic emergent teaching portfolio
Contributors: Julie Robinson, Lisa Cahill, and Rochelle Rodrigo Blanchard

Looping and Linking: Heuristics for Teacher Portfolio Development

We have provided examples of one teacher's engagement with the heuristics described in Chapter 2. Each example includes a brief introduction, making specific references to the guiding language offered in the chapter. We have organized these examples under the categories of looping and linking. Looping represents a reflective process in which teachers engage on a daily basis. They reflect on their classes, lesson plans, reading, institutional environments, and scholarly endeavors to "construct a teaching identity." Linking, on the other hand, connects a teacher's beliefs and philosophies to theories, actions, contexts, and practices in order to "communicate examples of teaching performances to multiple audiences in various rhetorical situations." As we imply in the chapter, developing teaching portfolio materials is an ongoing process, a process that lasts throughout one's teaching career. With this in mind, the following examples represent different snapshots of one teacher's on-going development over time. As the following materials suggest, we view teaching as a scholarly act that blurs the traditional boundaries among research, teaching, and service.

Looping:

Linking:

Chapter 3

Excerpts from promotion and tenure file
Contributor: Sarah Robbins

Chapter 4

Excerpts from job-search portfolio
Contributor: Peggy O' Neill

Chapter 5

Teaching statements drafted for 4 different purposes
Contributor: Ruth M. Mirtz

Chapter 6

Course materials on peer observation and from letter of recommendation
Contributor: Deborah Minter

Chapter 7

Sample course portfolios & heuristics for developing Course portfolios
Contributor: Amy M. Goodburn

Chapter 8

Representations of teaching & student voices in job-search dossier
Contributor: Magaret K. Willard-Traub