No More Mindless Homework (eBook) by Kathy Collins, Janine Bempechat,
Cart Search Mobile Navigation
No More Mindless Homework (eBook)
Download a Sample

No More Mindless Homework (eBook)

By Kathy Collins, Janine Bempechat, Edited by Nell K Duke, Edited by Ellin Oliver Keene
Foreword by Nell K Duke
Afterword by Ellin Oliver Keene

Kathy Collins and Janine Bempechat take on the stormy topic of homework by re-focusing the conversation from “to assign or not to assign” to how we can design engaging homework that harnesses children’s interests and fosters their learning.

eBook

In Stock

List Price: $20.63

Web/School Price: $14.44

Quantity

This product is part of the series:  The Not This, But That Series


(click any section below to continue reading)

Full Description

While schools around the nation reconsider homework policies, teachers, students, and parents continue to ride the wave of either too much, too little, too easy, or too hard homework assignments. In the expectation that children complete homework, sometimes they are assigned mindless “busy work.”  Kathy Collins and Janine Bempechat take on the stormy topic of homework by re-focusing the conversation from “to assign or not to assign” to how we can design engaging homework that harnesses children’s interests and fosters their learning. “Janine and I give you a research-based rationale and a more expansive view of homework that enables you to envision meaningful alternatives to worksheets, packets, and tasks that simply occupy children’s afterschool time,” Kathy writes. As Janine notes, “More than just ‘getting it done,’ homework can be an opportunity to foster positive beliefs about learning, establish meaningful habits of mind, and forge an academic identity.”

With strategies for adding choice, differentiation, relevance, and authentic feedback into homework assignments, you’ll discover how to reimagine homework in ways that promote lifelong learning habits in your students.

In Depth

I encourage you to read this book with attention to nuance and detail. This isn’t a book to fly through, but one to read with care, ideally in conversation with others. There are gems in here that a quick read might miss. For example, in a paragraph in section 2, Janine shares a study on the effects of teaching students strategies for managing their homework, including setting goals, self-evaluating, self-monitoring, and planning.

Students who received this training from their teachers over the course of five weeks, as compared to students who did not, demonstrated improved time management, self-reflection, self-efficacy, effort, interest, and desire for mastery—wow! Janine offers a powerful reminder that we can’t just assign homework, we need to teach students how to do homework.

In section 3, Kathy describes a scene in the classroom of fourth- grade teacher Kevin Moore. Students worked in small groups to dis- cuss how they solved a math problem assigned for homework the night before. Kathy “went from group to group, growing more enchanted by the intensity of children’s participation.” She explains that, “Mr. Moore circulated, too, offering support and asking follow-up and go-deeper questions.” Her description illustrates both that homework can provide a starting point for compelling in-class activity and that peer-to-peer interactions can be a productive—and time-saving—strategy for providing feedback on homework.

— From the Introduction

Samples

Related PD Services

PD Resources From Kathy Collins

Workshops

Email planningservices@heinemann.com if you would like to contact Janine Bempechat directly about professional development support. Email planningservices@heinemann.com if you would like to contact Nell K Duke directly about professional development support.

Seminars

Email planningservices@heinemann.com if you would like to contact Ellin Oliver Keene directly about professional development support.