Yes they need them payday loans our research into them.
- Start Your Own Discussion Thread
more »

-->
About|Contact|Help|College Desk/Exam
Login| Empty

Twitter Facebook YouTube Pinterest Blog

Teacher's Lounge Teachers' Lounge>Forum

Welcome to the Teachers' Lounge Forum

To begin, either Register or Login Now.

Once you've logged in, just click on one of the forums below.

To join an existing discussion, click on a topic that interests you. if you would like to contribute a comment, simple click "add reply". You can type your reply in the box below and when you are done click "add message". If you would like to be notified when someone posts a reply to this thread be sure to check the "Notify me when reply is posted" box.

If you would like to start a new discussion of your own, click the "new topic" link. In the subject line, type in a few words to tell us what your topic is. Click in the larger box and add your first comment to the discussion. When you are done click "add message".

You can always get updates on threads by subscribing to the Teachers' Lounge Forum through the RSS link below.

Messages in this topic - RSS

Home » Start Your Own Discussion Thread
Yes they need them payday loans our research into them.

Pick any topic of interest to you. Topics related to Fountas & Pinnell works can be created directly in the Fountas & Pinnell forum.
Yes they need them
9/17/2009 3:52:55 PM

User 417531
User 417531
Posts: 1
I just viewed Nancie Atwell's marvelous video response to the NY Times article on choice. I really hope Heinemann keeps that video up for a while so I have time to show it to all of my classes. I currently teach both graduate and undergraduate education classes in Reading and all of my classes will benefit from hearing her voice on this subject. I have been a advocate for Reading Workshop since Nancie's In the Middle first came out. I saw my own son read 60 books in 5th grade with a terrific teacher who knew that choice did not mean free for all.

We know that the more children read, the better they get at it. It's all about practice, practice, practice. With a Reader's Workshop model, children are more apt to read more and I think that hinges squarely on choice. Do you remember the summer reading lists you had in high school? As a voracious adult reader, when I think back honestly (as Nancie suggested) on my reading habits, I avoided the classics like the plague, used Cliff Notes, and faked it whenever I could. On a rare occasion, I came across a great read that was assigned (The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins set me off on mysteries) but that was incredibly rare. I read A Tree Grows in Brooklyn and tons of other books that I found relevant to my life. And they weren't all great literature...do you remember Mr. and Mrs. Bo Jo Jones? Yikes! But all of this reading showed me that I was likely to find wonderful things in books and the more I read the more I loved it. I eventually turned into an English major in college and it was there that the classics first held an appeal for me. Why one earth do we make kids read them in high school and make them hate those books forever.

There is a great article called "A Farewell to a Farewell to Arms" by Gay Ivey and Doug Fisher that came out a few years back that sums up why using YA Lit is so much more effective in getting kids to become readers. I teach YA Lit now and it is absolutely amazing what is being published now for teens. Young adults read these novels because they relate to the plots and the characters. Some of the YA literature actually uses themes straight from the classics - for example Beth Kephart's Undercover is a modern day version of Cyrano de Bergerac. John Marsden has just published a new take on Hamlet (called Hamlet oddly enough!). Now do you think it's more likely that a teen would pick up Cyrano and Shakespeare or these newer versions? Struggling readers will certainly opt for ones they can access and understand and, for once, they can access the world of ideas. Talk about discussion afterwards!

I'll never understand why the classics are placed so high in a pedestal. I feel that there are new classics coming out every day. Consider Sherman Alexie's The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian or Stork's new one, Marcelo in the Real World. These are books that make kids think about the world outside of themselves - it transforms them. We need to recognize that the classics are outdated in many ways and that getting kids to read requires that we look in new directions. And, through choice, students will find that the world of stories and ideas is the place to be.
Yes they need them payday loans our research into them.
0 permalink
9/19/2009 10:53:39 PM

User 417704
User 417704
Posts: 1
Debra Renner Smith co-author of Beyond Retelling: Toward Higher Level Thinking and Big Ideas
I am a reader, a second grade teacher, an independent literacy consultant who believes that all students deserve the opportunity of time in school to read. When teachers bless books by taking the time in class to them, students become curious about them. Past International Reading Association President, Linda Gambrell encourages us to remember to "bless books" by quickly talking about a few a day. I wrote about my success with this procedure in True Stories from Four-Blocks Classrooms on pages 23-32.
Yes they need them payday loans our research into them.
0 permalink
10/12/2009 12:48:40 PM

User 419342
User 419342
Posts: 1
The discussion of choice in reading seems to be limited to reading workshop teachers. I am a business teacher, currently taking classes towards an endorsement in reading. The students in this class includes two other business teachers, a music teacher, an art teacher and a history teacher as well as reading teachers. Obviously, creating lifelong readers is a priority for teachers across the curriculum.

I am interested in incorporating free choice reading into my classroom. Last year, I selected two versions of a book, Fast Food Nation or Chew on This depending on reading level, for one of my classes. Although it went very well, it took up a lot of time and I worried about not covering the required curriculum. I have identified a few more books I could use, such as Nickel and Dimed, Freakonomics and The Cheating Culture.

I would love to hear from content area teachers on how they incorporate whole books into their classes and how it has been going. r
Yes they need them payday loans our research into them.
0 permalink
10/20/2009 9:38:00 AM

User 419872
User 419872
Posts: 1
So cool to hear about your work in business class, giving kids real books to read! I have also used the Schlosser pair of texts -- how convenient to have a harder and easier book about fast food to choose from -- with a variety of classes. Have also used selections from Nickel and Dimed (she does report a "chemical indiscretion" in there, which may not be the best modeling for kids, tho it is funny how she shops for those detox products at Walgreens...)
Some others my kids have liked are E=MC2 by David Bodanis (the first 80 pages or so), The World without Us by Alan Weisman, Shadow Divers by Robert Kurson. But for your biz class another great one is Postville, by Steven Bloom, about how this Kosher meatpacking company suddenly arrives in a small Iowa town and quickly becomes the dominant force in the community of puzzled farmers.
Harvey AKA Smokey Daniels
Yes they need them payday loans our research into them.
0 permalink
12/4/2009 3:24:17 PM

User 422584
User 422584
Posts: 1
For the last ten years of my career at Concord High, I had students spend substantial amounts of time doing ibndividualized reading (over considerable objections from some of my colleagues that I was subverting the curriculum in American lit). Although I was known as the film man for creating a film study caourse in 1971, I regard individualized reading as the other great accomplishment of my career. I had to figure good ways to get them writing and effective ways to asses that, but about the reading itself I never had any doubt. Yes, some kids read Grisham and King (Hey, I began to, also). Others read Catch-22 and Moby-Dick and the Rabbit tetrology (with understanding, as their writing clearly showed). Most read a variety of stuff -- Hawthorne one week, a mystery novel the next. Everybody, in terms of quantity, read much more than they would have if they had been doing assigned texts; some would read a book per week. I began this on the instigation of my wife, also a teacher, who picked it up from a colleague at her school. I was fearful at first about giving up control. Ha! The results were astounding. I would leave sub plans saying that the lasty 1/2-hour of each class was for silent reading and the substitutes would be amazed at what they saw. Of course, when I was there I read, too, and students and I would recommend books to each other. What I learned most of all is that there is no such thing as literature. There are only books. I got hooked on reading as a teen with Kenneth Roberts and Rex Stout, but that didn't mean I couldn't be reading Henry James in college. MY wife and gave presentations in the 90s on our methods at the NH and NE Asociations of Teachers of English and at the Reading Stephen King conference in Bangor. I would be happy to share my experience in more detail.
Yes they need them payday loans our research into them.
0 permalink