Introduction to the Poem by Robert W. Boynton, Maynard Mack Jr
Introduction to the Poem

Introduction to the Poem

This latest edition retains the features that have made Introduction to the Poem a superb text from which to teach and learn. Bob Boynton and Maynard Mack's intent from the first has been to suggest ways of approaching a poem that will make it more understandable and enjoyable--to introduce students to the art of reading poetry. The authors readily admit that often a poem doesn't make immediate total sense. But a poem makes immediate rhythmic sense if it's read aloud, and meaning will come with increasing pleasure if the right approaches are taken - if, basically, a reader respects his or her native...

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Full Description

This latest edition retains the features that have made Introduction to the Poem a superb text from which to teach and learn. Bob Boynton and Maynard Mack's intent from the first has been to suggest ways of approaching a poem that will make it more understandable and enjoyable--to introduce students to the art of reading poetry. The authors readily admit that often a poem doesn't make immediate total sense. But a poem makes immediate rhythmic sense if it's read aloud, and meaning will come with increasing pleasure if the right approaches are taken - if, basically, a reader respects his or her native wit and lets the poem do its work. The approach of this book helps clarify what a poem is and does, and how a good reader reenacts the experience it offers.

Contents

Contents:
I. The Poem as Subject 1.
The Subject of a Poem My Be Anything Whatever 2. The Subject of a Poem Is Not the Same Thing as Its Theme 3. The Meaning of a Poem Is Not the Same Thing as Its Subject or Its Theme II. The Poem as a Dramatic Situation 4. Every Poem Has a Speaker 5. The Speaker of a Poem Speaks from a Personal Situation 6. The Speaker of a Poem Speaks to Some Kind of Audience 7. Every Poem Is Characterized by a Distinctive Tone III. The Poem as a Pattern of Rhythm and Sound 8. Rhythm 9. Meter 10. Sound IV. Devices of Compression: The Poet's Shorthand 11. Overstatement 12. Understatement 13. Irony and Paradox 14. Comparison V. Additional Poems Chronologically Arranged