Category Archives: Elementary

Tools Don’t Teach, Teachers Do! Using Tools to Support Our Teaching & Teach to Independence

Teachers Toolkits

Written by Anna Gratz Cockerille

Building a strong workshop practice is similar to building a house. Doing it successfully takes expertise, patience, foresight, flexibility, and, of course, the right tools. Having an arsenal of resources to draw upon, in minilessons and in conferences and small groups, is key when you need to teach on your feet, reflexively and quickly meeting the needs of a range of students. 

Just as no two teachers are the same, and no two groups of students are the same, so must teachers’ toolkits be varied, personalized by the teacher and set up to best support the teachers' current group. A toolkit might be a binder filled with text samples and checklists, or it might be a digital toolkit filled with resources available at the touch of a button. A toolkit’s mode of delivery is far less important than its usability and connection to students’ needs. However you decide to store your teaching toolkit, digitally or in a good, old-fashioned binder, here are some tips for its organization and development.

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Mindset and Understanding How The Brain Does What it Does

Mindset_3H6A0024s

In A Mindset for Learning, authors Kristine Mraz and Christine Hertz show teachers how, through explicit instruction, they can their turn classroom thinking from that of a fixed mindset to one of a growth mindset, and how together students and teachers can create classrooms of risk and resilience. In the following excerpt, the authors talk about the power that our brain's established neural pathways have over our interpretation of information, and how we have the power to change. 

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Framing Science Learning With Coherent Science Stories

The Stories of Science
Science stories can be compelling vehicles for connecting people to information. When we create overarching story lines for instruction (within a unit, throughout a year of study, or over several years), students are more likely to remember what we teach. Information is more likely to stick because (as cognitive science shows) stories are the basic organizing principle for memory. Compelling stories also engage more of the brain (Berns et al. 2013). Also, students can begin to see the big ideas of science and how they connect across disciplines. Finally, the story lines give students a coherent framework to hang their learning on.

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View a clip from our Webinar Series with Colleen Cruz

Our first live webinar session with Colleen Cruz was packed with thinking about a mindset for teaching writing, strategies to guide repetitive student writing, mirror writing, and more!

In this clip below, you'll hear Colleen give advice for helping students move past the same old writing and launch an exercise with webinar participants as they dig in to student writing to problem solve together.  

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Upcoming Webinar Series: Reading Conferences

"Researchers have calculated that teachers engage in literally thousands of oral interactions with children every day. What we say and the way we say it shapes children's understanding more than any other pedagogical tool we use."

Ellin Keene in To Understand: New Horizons in Reading Comprehension (2008)

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New Editions of Two Marie Clay Resources

Heinemann is proud to be the U.S. distributor of Marie Clay’s work. To influence new generations of teachers, the Marie Clay Literacy Trust brings us these refreshed editions of key titles. Marie’s words are untouched, but the Trust has updated references and surrounding features as appropriate. 

We are thrilled to announce the two newest editions of beloved Marie Clay favorites.

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