Tag Archives: Not This But That

Shifting Class Instruction Toward Differentiation

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The research is compelling: When teachers differentiate reading instruction, students learn more. But teachers are too often given the expectation of differentiation without the details on how to make it work. In No More Reading Instruction Without Differentiation, Lynn Bigelman and Debra Peterson offer a framework that adapts instruction based on individual students' needs and interests.

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The Discourse Against Homework: Concerns and Solutions

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Homework. The word alone evokes strong emotions from children, youth, parents, and teachers. For most teachers, this word sits right between rock and hard place. Assign too much homework, and teachers run the risk of complaints, if not outright misery, from parents, students, and—feeling the need to give feedback on all that homework—themselves. Assign too little homework, and teachers risk being seen as “soft” and lacking in rigor, and because homework can feel like it helps “cover” the curriculum, feeling further behind. And that just regards the issue of how much homework. Then there are all the complexities around what kinds of homework.

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How English Learners Elevate Learning in the Classroom

English Learners are often seen through a deficit lens, particularly in mainstream classrooms in which teachers have little or no training in how to meet their needs. In No More Low Expectations for English Learners, esteemed EL researcher Jana Echevarría argues that teacher attitude affects student achievement, and describes what best practice methods for supporting ELs academic achievement look like.  Julie Nora, an educator and advocate, offers strategies to provide the instructional supports ELs need for both language acquisition and content-area learning.ntbt-el-aug31

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How to Make the Best Book Recommendations for Students

NNTBT_NoMoreReading4Junk_1Pizza. Pez dispensers. Nerf balls. When we give students “junk” to reward reading, we are focusing their intention away from the act of reading and from their own independence as readers. Instead, we can create classrooms where reading is seen as its own reward. In No More Reading for Junk, esteemed researcher Linda Gambrell provides a research-based context for cultivating children’s intrinsic motivation to read. Reading specialist and researcher Barbara Marinak shares the strategies and techniques that make a difference for student readers’ motivation, turning disengaged readers into passionate ones. 

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How Can Teachers Address the Needs of English Language Learners

English Learners are seen through a deficit lens, particularly in mainstream classrooms in which teachers have little or no training in how to meet their needs. In No More Low Expectations for English Learners, esteemed EL researcher Jana Echevarría argues that teacher attitude affects student achievement, and describes what best practice methods for supporting ELs academic achievement look like.  Julie Nora, an educator and advocate, offers strategies to provide the instructional supports ELs need for both language acquisition and content-area learning.ntbt-el-aug31

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The Ways We Deny English Learners Access

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Too often in classrooms, we describe English Learners by what they cannot do rather than by what they can do. Particularly in mainstream classrooms—in which teachers have little or no training in how to meet their needs—English Learners are seen through a deficit lens.

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