Tag Archives: MiddleWeb

Your Heinemann Link Round-Up for February 28–March 5

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These links are interviews with educators, posts from our authors' and friends' blogs, and any interesting, newsworthy item from the past seven days. Check back each week for a new round of finds!

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Your Heinemann Link Round-Up for the Week of October 18–24

boatsawaychaps

Time for a link round-up! Stop whatever it is that you're doing and click these links. What are you doing? Another circle time? Are you interrupting a moment of authentic engagement to comment on how engaged everyone is? Stop that. Let it unfold. Click these links instead.

These links are interviews with educators, posts from our authors' and friends' blogs, and any interesting, newsworthy item from the past seven days. Check back each week for a new round of finds!

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Your Heinemann Link Round-Up for the Week of September 13–19

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Welcome to the Heinemann Link Round-Up. Like apples from a tree, these links are ready to be picked and baked into a crisp. Enjoy them!

These links are interviews with educators, posts from our authors' and friends' blogs, and any interesting, newsworthy item from the past seven days. Check back each week for a new round of finds!

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At MiddleWeb, Glenda Moyer reviewed the second edition Scaffolding Language, Scaffolding Learning by Pauline Gibbons.

Eavesdropping on second graders in science class, we hear students doing experiments in small groups, preparing to present their results to classmates. Gibbons notes how the teacher “leads from behind,” asking questions to encourage generalizations, giving students more time to think, recasting student responses, modeling alternative forms of appropriate language that facilitates writing in the last stage. Explicitly teaching vocabulary, she modifies her sentences to include literate talk, which can serve as a “bridge” to more formal wording that is appropriate for writing later.

Click through to read the full review

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Rebekah O'Dell and Allison Marchetti, coauthors of Writing With Mentors, will participate in the #ELAchat Twitter chat on September 29 at 7:00 p.m. CST.

Click here for more information

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On her blog To Make A Prairie, author Vicki Vinton wrote about beliefs, books, and being true to yourself.

To begin that work, we collaboratively created a Statement of Beliefs, a document that captures a baker’s dozen of tenets that reflect the group’s jointly held beliefs about how children best learn and how, therefore, teachers and schools need to approach teaching. For each of these thirteen beliefs we provided a more in-depth explanation as well as a description of practices we currently see in many schools that reflect a very different—and we think problematic—set of beliefs. Then with the help of Heinemann, we invited educators and thinkers from across the field to write essays that would in someway connect to one or more of these beliefs.

Click through to read the full post

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That's it! Be sure to check back next week for another round of links. If you have a link or a blog, be sure to mention them in the comments below. You can also email them to us or tweet at us. We're pretty available over here. Cheers to your weekend!

*Photo by Elizabeth Lies

Your Heinemann Link Round-Up for the Week of July 26–August 1

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Welcome to this week's link round-up. It is the final week of July, and a cool weather system is moving south from Canada. By now, back-to-school ads have hit your airwaves, and your students—called "campers" during these off-months—have just remembered their summer reading assignments. 

Each week we find around five interesting reads for you to take into the weekend. These links are interviews with educators, posts from our authors' and friends' blogs, and any interesting, newsworthy item from the past seven days. Check back each week for a new round of finds!

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At the blog A Teaching Life, Tara Smith posted some takeaways from Colleen Cruz's The Unstoppable Writing Teacher:

That act of believing is one of those deliberate teacher stances that is vital to our kids, but something we really have to will ourselves to do. The act of truly believing in the author’s intent allows us to prod her into something more than just another story about a roller coaster ride. This is something to remember and live by every teaching day.

Click through to read the full analysis.

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Jennifer Serravallo wrote a guest post for MiddleWeb called "Expanding Our Approach to Reading Strategies."

To me, a strategy is never a single word or phrase—it’s a series of actionable steps, a process to help readers tackle a skill that is not yet automatic for them. I also think strategies expand beyond comprehension into other areas of reading such as decoding, reading with fluency, developing stamina and engagement, writing about reading, and conversing about texts.

Click through to read Jen's full article.

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Penny Kittle was a guest on Brian Sztabnik's Talks With Teachers podcast. In the episode, Penny discusses Donald Graves, the Book Love Foundation, and the most effective minilessons.

Listen to the full episode here.

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On the New York Times's Opinionator blog, David Bornstein wrote a piece that mentions Teachers College at Columbia University. In "Teaching Social Skills to Improve Grades and Lives," Bornstein writes,

This isn’t a new insight. In a national survey, more than 90 percent of schoolteachers said it was important for schools to promote the development of students’ social and emotional skills (sometimes called 21st century skills, noncognitive skills, or character education). But many struggle to integrate this kind of teaching in their classrooms.

Click through to read the full article.

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We leave you with this Key & Peele sketch you've no doubt seen cascading down your newsfeeds this week. The two comedians imagine a world in which the cultures of athletes and teachers have switched, framed as a SportsCenter segment:

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That's it! Be sure to check back next week for another round of links. If you have a link or a blog, be sure to mention them in the comments below. Cheers to your weekend!

*Photo via Krzysztof Krupa