Tag Archives: Mary Howard

10 Lessons Teachers Taught Me About Good to Great Teaching

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With each tick of the instructional clock, we can lift students to great heights of learning or hold them cognitive hostages in an instructional dead end. Great work doesn’t happen by chance. It’s a conscious choice we make using a new mind-set that forever alters our thinking. — From Good to Great Teaching: Focusing on the Literacy Work That Matters, pg. 96

In August 2012, Good to Great Teaching: Focusing on the Literacy Work That Matters was published (Heinemann). As my fifth anniversary approaches, I am reminded of the impact this experience had on me personally and professionally. Bringing Good to Great Teaching to life in the company of dedicated educators launched a collaborative exploratory journey that still lingers five years later.

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A Heart Maps Twitter Chat with Georgia Heard

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On Thursday evening (Oct.20), Georgia Heard joined Dr. Mary Howard, author of Good to Great: Focusing on the Literacy Work That Matters, to discuss Heard's new book Heart Maps: Helping Students Create and Craft Authentic WritingFor decades Georgia Heard has guided students into more authentic writing experiences by using heart maps to explore what we all hold inside: feelings, passions, vulnerabilities, and wonderings. 

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Your Heinemann Link Round-Up for May 15–21

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Time for another link round-up! A reminder that there's an email subscription form at the bottom of this post, so you can get the Heinemann Link Round-Up delivered to your inbox every week.

These links are interviews with educators, posts from our authors' and friends' blogs, and any interesting, newsworthy item from the past seven days. Check back each week for a new round of finds!

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Your Heinemann Link Round-Up for the Week of October 4–10

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It's another week and another round of education links! That's a nice picture above, isn't it? I took it.

These links are interviews with educators, posts from our authors' and friends' blogs, and any interesting, newsworthy item from the past seven days. Check back each week for a new round of finds!

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Larry Ferlazzo posted the first in a series about grit. Authors Kristi Mraz and Christine Hertz were featured. Here's a sample of their response:

If grit is an ability to sustain interest and effort in something for a long period, we also need to teach a system of checks and balances for children to ensure that the thing they pursue is worthwhile and healthy- not only to them, but also to the world at large. Grit, in and of itself, can result in positive or negative outcomes. Sustaining interest and effort in a long term criminal enterprise demonstrates grit, but not many people would say that is a good thing. We, as teachers, should not just teach grit, but also the equally important traits of empathy, optimism, flexibility, and a practice of reflection to decide if the path we are on at given point is good for us, and good for the world.

Click through to read the entire post

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Frank Serafini (Reading Workshop 2.0) wrote about picture books in the digital age:

Readers of digital picturebooks must work through the presentation of a fictional narrative using physical, cognitive, visual, emotional, and embodied capabilities, among others. As picturebook narratives in digital formats evolve and become part of the reading curriculum in more classrooms, picturebook scholars, literacy educators, and classroom teachers will need new lenses or frameworks for analyzing these texts and developing pedagogical approaches that support classroom instruction and readers’ transactions across digital and print-based platforms. In this article, we will consider the features and designs of picturebook apps and some challenges and possibilities these digital texts offer elementary grade teachers and students.

Click through to read his full post

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At Moving Writers, Rebekah O'Dell quit grading. She explains:

I quit grading individual assignments — classwork, participation, annotated Poems of the Week, even papers. I make notes in the gradebook and leave copious feedback on each assignment. But, I don’t assign a grade value to their work. Students are encouraged to use the feedback to revise any work they would like to revise — it’s about getting it right, getting it better, not about getting a higher grade.

Read the full post

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"It's time to take a hard look at how we teach reading," says Nancie Atwell for The Telegraph:

Methods matter. So do the findings of literacy research. We have almost a quarter century of studies that document how literacy blooms wherever students have access to books they want to read, permission to choose their own, and time to get lost in them. Enticing collections of literature—interesting books written at levels they can decode with accuracy and comprehend with ease—are key to children becoming skilled, thoughtful, avid readers.

Click through to read Nancie's full editorial

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That's it! Be sure to check back next week for another round of links. If you have a link or a blog, be sure to mention them in the comments below. You can also email them to us or tweet at us. We're pretty available over here. Cheers to your weekend!

*Photo by Cameron

Your Heinemann Link Round-Up for the Week of August 16–22

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Welcome to this week's link round-up. Each week we find around five interesting reads for you to take into the weekend. These links are interviews with educators, posts from our authors' and friends' blogs, and any interesting, newsworthy item from the past seven days. Check back each week for a new round of finds!

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Kristi Mraz on how to change the world:

We, as people, make so much of the world with our minds. We fill in the blanks with stories and suppositions, we interpret with the facts we have, and we make sense of senseless things so that we can go on living. But how many times are we wrong? How many times are our stories linking events false? How many times do we not have enough facts to make the interpretations we do? How many times have we made sense of something, that was in fact, just senseless?

Read the full text of "How to Change the World" on Kinderconfidential

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NPR's education section ran a feature on the changing design of schools:

"Because of the baby boomers, lots of schools were built in the 1950s and 1960s," he says. "Those are coming to the end of their shelf life. And since the 1960s, education has changed so much, both in the way we approach it and the way we participate in it. Learning has changed but facilities haven't. That's where we come in."

Read "A Design Firm Rethinks Learning Spaces"

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Kari Yates asks teachers to commit to what REALLY MATTERS:

Let’s remember that our decision to become an educator is not a just a choice made long ago; it is a choice made over and over every single time we cross the threshold of the schoolhouse. Let’s do whatever we are able to live up to the respect this great profession deserves. Yes, this year let’s remember we’re here by choice.

Click here to read "This Year Let's Just Do It!"

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Author Lisa Eickholdt is participating in two of Dr. Mary Howard's #G2Great Twitter chats next month. Be sure to follow @LisaEickholdt, @DrMaryHoward, and the hashtag #G2Great.

Lisa's chats will occur on September 3 and September 10.

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Finally here's a video from Kathy Collins:

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That's it! Be sure to check back next week for another round of links. If you have a link or a blog, be sure to mention them in the comments below. You can also email them to us or tweet at us. We're pretty available over here. Cheers to your weekend!

*Photo by Frantzou Fleurine