Tag Archives: Kimberly Parker

PLC Series: Advocacy, Not Neutrality

Welcome back to the Heinemann Professional Development Professional Learning Community (PLC) series. We are excited to present a new format for the 2017-2018 year! 

Each month, we'll share 2 posts designed to provoke thinking and discussion, through a simple framework for utilizing mini-collections of linked content into your professional development time. 

♦♦♦♦

This month, our posts will support critical thinking, self-examination, and crucial discussion about our responsibility as educators to strive for social justice. 
♦♦♦♦

PLC Series 9.18.17 Friere

Connect >

Exploring the meaning of the words “duty” and “neutrality” in the context of your role in education will call upon you to examine and articulate your belief systems. Make a list of what comes to mind when you consider your definition of duty in education. Make a list of instances where you find yourself seeking a “safe zone” of neutrality.

Continue reading

This is What Segregation Looks Like, and How Heinemann Fellow Dr. Kim Parker is Working to Change It

Image_KimParker_Blog


I teach at Cambridge Rindge and Latin high school. Rindge sits in the shadow of Harvard University—one of the best institutions for higher learning in the world. Yet, despite many who insist that my school’s diversity and opportunity are afforded to all students, I know otherwise. Here, students begin the ninth grade on one of two tracks: the (misnamed) College Prep track or the Honors track. The College Prep (CP) track (or “Colored People” track as some students unofficially call it) serves students of color, students with disabilities, students of lower socioeconomic class, and others. The Honors track tends to include students who are white, middle or upper class, and who have parents who are actively involved in their educations.

Students experience education differently depending on their track designation.

Continue reading

Heinemann Fellow Aeriale Johnson: To Tiana, With Love

Fellows

As a college student, at twenty, I found myself under the tutelage of an educator of color for the first time ever. I did not learn from another one until I was thirty. During my tenure as an educator, I have served students as diverse as America itself. I scoured my memory. I can merely recall fewer than ten colleagues of color among the hundreds with whom I’ve worked. In March I traveled from rural Alaska to New York City to visit Heinemann Fellow Tiana Silvas and her colleagues at PS 59. I was looking for effective instructional strategies. At forty, nineteen years into my teaching career, I found what I hope all thoughtful, passionate educators, regardless of race or ethnicity, will someday find in order to better serve our students. I found community—just as I am.

Continue reading

Taking A Closer Look at “The Hate U Give”

Fellows_EmbroideredLog

By Tricia Ebarvia and Dr. Kim Parker

Have you read Angie Thomas’ The Hate U Give? Read on to hear our initial thoughts. Then join us on Monday, May 1, at 8 p.m. EST when we’ll be hosting a Twitter chat using the hashtag #TeachHateUGive. Scroll to the bottom of this post to preview our discussion questions.

What’s the point of having a voice if you’re gonna be silent in those moments you shouldn’t be?

—Angie Thomas, The Hate U Give

Continue reading

NCTE16 Don Graves Breakfast Podcast

donaldgravesToday on the Heinemann Podcast, we're exploring credo. 

In 2013, Heinemann celebrated the legacy of Don Graves at a special breakfast during the National Council of Teachers of English conference in Boston. Three years later, at the 2016 NCTE conference, we wanted to reprise this moment by inviting those in attendance to consider the theme of credo. The event was hosted by Tom Newkirk and Penny Kittle and featured Heinemann authors Katherine Bomer, Smokey Daniels, Georgia Heard Allison Marchetti, Rebekah O’Dell, Cornelius Minor and Heinemann Fellow, Kimberly Parker. We began the event with a welcome from Heinemann’s General Manager, Vicki Boyd. Listen below: 

Continue reading

Play