Tag Archives: Chartchums

PLC Series: Using Charts…Smarter!

Welcome to the Heinemann PD Professional Learning Community Series. This month we will discuss how to tap into the power of visual memory.

“No matter what area of the curriculum, we found that clear visuals, simple language, and constant reflection on charts were the key to helping children gain independence and agency in their learning. The more we charted, the less repeating we did and more teaching was possible.”          

 -Kristi Mraz and Marjorie Martinelli in Smarter Charts for Math,          Science and Social Studies.

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Your Heinemann Link Round-Up for the Week of January 24–30

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Welcome back to the Link Round-Up. It's the last week of January, which is traditionally the week I can finally get some time at the gym's elliptical.

These links are interviews with educators, posts from our authors' and friends' blogs, and any interesting, newsworthy item from the past seven days. Check back each week for a new round of finds!

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Your Heinemann Link Round-Up for the Week of September 28–October 2

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Welcome BACK to the Heinemann Link Round-Up. Your intrepid rounder-upper was on vacation last week, and thus nothing was lassoed, nothing was harangued. Here we are again with a full pen of links.

These links are interviews with educators, posts from our authors' and friends' blogs, and any interesting, newsworthy item from the past seven days. Check back each week for a new round of finds!

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The official Global Teacher Prize blog wrote out "3 Life Changing Lessons from Teacher Prize Winner Nancie Atwell’s Keynote at CGI."

Nearly a quarter of American children fail to achieve minimum levels of literary. For Nancie, the solution is books. She says “book reading is just about the best thing about being human and alive on the planet.” For this reason, children cannot be allowed to discover the joys of reading by accident – an enticing collection of literature is central to the children becoming competent, voracious and engaged readers. This collection must include writing at a variety of levels, from a variety of genres and to appeal to every taste.

Click through to read the full post

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NPR's Weekend Edition did some research on homework. Here it is:

 In 2012, students in three different age groups—9, 13 and 17—were asked, "How much time did you spend on homework yesterday?" The vast majority of 9-year-olds (79 percent) and 13-year-olds (65 percent) and still a majority of 17-year-olds (53 percent) all reported doing an hour or less of homework the day before. Another study from the National Center for Education Statistics found that high school students who reported doing homework outside of school did, on average, about seven hours a week.

Click through to read or listen to "Homework: A New User's Guide"

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In NCTM’s “Teaching Children Mathematics,” Children’s Mathematics coauthor Susan Empson looks at the strategies used by fifth-graders to solve division-of-fraction problems set in the context of making mugs of hot chocolate.

Children in the elementary grades can solve fraction story problems by drawing on their informal understanding of partitioned quantities and whole-number operations (Empson and Levi 2011; Mack 2001). Given the opportunity, children use this understanding to model fractional quantities, such as 1/4 of a quesadilla, and reason about relationships between these quantities, such as how much quesadilla there would be if 1/4 of a quesadilla, 1/4 of a quesadilla, and 1/4 of a quesadilla were combined.

Click through to read the full post

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Both chums in the Chartchums (Marjorie Martinelli & Kristi Mraz) have had busy years with other projects, so it's always great to see them back with a blog. This week: organizing charts.

When projects come to an end and before new ones begin, starting off with a fresh clean start helps one move forward. Whether you have taught for one year or twenty, the amount of paper and stuff accumulated can become mountainous. Inspired by the book, The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing (Ten Speed Press 2014) by Marie Kondo, who suggests discarding as the first rule of tidying, we thought about how we could apply this to charts so that we start off the year with a fresh and tidy start. Marie Kondo’s only rule about what to keep is to hold each item in your hands and to ask, “Does this spark joy?” For a teacher to be able to answer this question you need to also ask, “Can I use this again?” “Will this save me time?” “Will this engage my kids?”

Click through to read "The Magical Art of Organizing Charts"

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And we have a round-up competitor in Dana Johansen at Two Writing Teachers! It's a great round-up of tweets about writing from September. Click here for it! 

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That's it! Be sure to check back next week for another round of links. If you have a link or a blog, be sure to mention them in the comments below. You can also email them to us or tweet at us. We're pretty available over here. Cheers to your weekend!

*Photo by Matt Lee

Your Heinemann Link Round-Up for the Week of May 24–30

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Welcome to the newest installment in our weekly link series on the Heinemann blog! Every week we find around five interesting links for you to take into your much deserved weekend. These links are interviews with educators, posts from our authors' and friends' blogs, and any interesting, newsworthy item from the past seven days. Check back each week for a new round of finds!

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In a timely piece from Edutopia, eighth-grade teacher Heather Wolpert-Gawron offered tips to combat summer learning loss:

Research the based-on-books movies that are coming out during the summer months. Show trailers the last day of school (like when the kids from your first period are trapped in your classroom for three hours while promotion is going on elsewhere). Show these trailers and hand out a list of books that correspond to each. Challenge students to read the books before seeing the movies.

Click through to read "Avoiding the Summer Slide in Reading and Writing."

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Kristi Mraz and Marjorie Martinelli wrote a review of Jen Serravallo's The Reading Strategies Bookusing the classic post-cyberpunk film The Matrix as an extended metaphor:

For many, “seeing the matrix” has become shorthand for suddenly understanding an underlying principal that had seemed magical, or in more common vernacular, for finally “getting it.” Now we have Jennifer Serravallo’s new book, The Reading Strategies Book to demystify what makes for powerful reading instruction, and make “the matrix” of teaching reading accessible to us all.

Click through to read the full review at the official Chartchums web site.

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Continuing the summer reading thread, Cathy Mere wrote about how to offer additional literacy support during those three months without school:

To help parents to hear about new book titles, ways to keep their children reading across the summer, and to share other information, I invited parents to school to hear more about summer reading. The ELL teacher and our media specialist jumped in to help. We offered two different times for parents in hopes of making it possible for more parents to attend. Key discussion topics included:  getting kids excited about summer reading, places to find books, ways to connect with other readers, using our reading website for updated information across the summer and strategies for supporting young readers.

Click through to read "Getting Students Ready for Summer Reading" at Reflect & Refine.

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On her blog, Renee Dinnerstein asked, "What will the children remember?" She contacted former students and many of them responded with a vivid memory:

Sara (kindergarten, 1996)
I remember looking at meal worms. We had a big tank with a bunch of bugs and we could pick them up with tweezers if we wanted to. I also remember days when I would choose something like puzzles at Choice Time because I thought I wanted to do something quiet by myself, but then I’d be bored halfway through and regret my decision. It was always better to choose the ‘special activity’ or the one all your friends chose.

Click through to read the rest of the recollections.

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That's it! Be sure to check back next week for another round of links. If you have a link or a blog, be sure to mention them in the comments below. Cheers to you!

Your Heinemann Link Round-Up for the Week of May 10–16

imagineitbetter

Welcome to the newest installment in our weekly link series on the Heinemann blog! Every week we find around five interesting links for you to take into your much deserved weekend. These links are interviews with educators, posts from our authors' and friends' blogs, and any interesting, newsworthy item from the past seven days. Check back each week for a new round of finds!

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Author Vicki Vinton advocated for an alternate route in determining text complexity for standardized assessments:

The Common Core seems to have ushered in an age where third grade has become the new middle school, middle school is the new high school, and high school is the new college. And that’s all because of the particular vision the Common Core authors have about what it means to be college and career ready.

Click through to read "Toward a Saner View of Text Complexity" on To Make a Prairie

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Kylene Beers revealed the results to a survey she conducted that asked 1,000 teachers, "What reading skills do you most often teach to skilled readers" and, "What reading skills to you most often teach to less skilled readers?"

If kids never have the chance to question the text, then they never learn to question the text. If their teacher doesn’t give them time to learn to question the author or make inferences, they don’t learn to do those things. More worrisome, they perhaps begin to assume that they should not question the text, not question the author, not look for biases, not make inferences.

Click through to read "Who is Taught What?" on Kylene Beers's blog

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Marjorie Martinelli and Kristi Mraz—known in professional circles as The Chartchums—have joined with us to offer online workshops: Chartchums Live! (or as close as we can get).

We planned the course with the hope that it would help teachers deepen children’s engagement with charts by teaching how charts can build independence and agency, communicate information efficiently and effectively, and help in setting and achieving goals.

Click through to learn more from the Chartchums

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On Bright, in the Medium publishing platform, Soraya Shockley of Youth Radio discussed education technology from a student's point of view:

A Teenager’s View on Education Technology

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Patricia Vitale-Reilly, author of Engaging Every Learner, was interviewed on Four O'Clock Faculty:

Check back next week for more interesting links. Do you write a blog about your experiences in education? Leave a link in the comments below and we'll consider it for future round-ups. Have a great weekend!

Chart tips from the ChartChums: Part 2 Icons

In Smarter Charts and the brand new Smarter Charts for Math, Science, and Social Studies, Marjorie Martinelli(@MarjorieWrites) and Kristi Mraz(@MrazKristine) tell us you don’t even have to be able to draw to make great charts.

Even so, we could all use a pointer or two on how to make our charts look better. In these snippets from their forthcoming online course at the Heinemann Digital Campus, the ChartChums demonstrate a couple key drawing moves that can help any teacher who wants to make great charts. In part two we learn about the importance of drawing icons.

 

Smarter Charts for Math, Science, and Social Studies is out now. For more information and to download a sample chapter click here: Smarter Charts for Math, Science, and Social Studies sample. 

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