Tag Archives: Carl Anderson

Standing on Shoulders

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By Jennifer Serravallo

The Writing Strategies Book started shipping this week. I’ve been overwhelmed and humbled by the positive responses and enthusiasm from so many. Before you all get this book in your hands, though, I need to get something off my chest:

This book would not exist were it not for a community of friends, mentors, colleagues and teachers—giants—whom I’ve been lucky to know. I want you all to know them, too.

My most immediate teacher and mentor around the teaching of writing is Lucy Calkins. I first read her books in college, leaned on them heavily throughout my years in the classroom, and eventually was lucky enough to spend years with her at the Teachers College Reading and Writing Project. Her contributions are deep-reaching—not only in writing curriculum and workshop methods of instruction but also as a mentor to so many who have gone on to inspire others. If you asked Lucy, though, she’d probably tell you she stands on the shoulders of her mentors, chief among them Don Graves. I came to Graves’ books, such as Writing: Teachers and Children at Work, many years after being introduced to Lucy’s books, but through Lucy, I was learning from this work years before going directly to the source.

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Writing Masters: Conferring with Students Across the Writing Process

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With classroom-tested tips from our Curricular Resources authors on how to improve your teaching at any grade level, each Writing Masters installment will share author insights and practical suggestions on teaching writing in the classroom that you can use the very next day. This week in the Writing Master series, Carl Anderson describes the conversational moves he uses in student conferences.

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Introducing The Writing Masters Blog Series

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"The real questions for writing teachers are, 'How do we help our students develop a repertoire of approaches to writing? How do we help all writers identify problems, solve them, and take charge of their writing and thinking?'"
—Nancie Atwell

Writing is a complex, nuanced, and sometimes mystical journey. Ideas take shape in ways we wouldn’t expect—and sometimes they struggle to take shape at all. As teachers, we strive to guide our students through this process—to encourage, support, and challenge them. Now imagine having master teachers mentor you along the way. Imagine being invited to pull up a chair and sit shoulder-to-shoulder as they detail their learning goals for a unit, outline a powerful way to present a challenging concept, or expertly confer with a student?

Join us this fall for our Writing Masters blog series with classroom-tested tips from our Curricular Resources authors on how to improve your teaching of writing at any grade level. Each installment in this series will share author insights and practical suggestions on teaching writing in the classroom that you can use the very next day.

Check the Heinemann blog each Wednesday to see the next installment in this series—and sign up below to be notified by email when each new blog is posted.

To explore more resources by these master teachers and others, visit our Curricular Resources page.