Category Archives: Writing

PLC Series: Independent Writing Time

Welcome to a new year of content and conversation in our PLC Series. This month we focus on the craft of teaching writers—not the writing.


One of the most overwhelming pieces for teachers in a reading and writing workshop model is managing all of the moving parts. If writing workshop is new for you, it is likely that fears swirl into questions in your mind: Can they write on their own? How do I release control? How do coach my writers as individuals when there are so many of them?

Teacher and blogger Betsy Hubbard (@Betsy_Writes) shares her wisdom in this article, available for download below, from the Heinemann Digital Library.  She describes the roles of monitoring and conferring with writers, as well explains how these practices support each other. Reflecting on the notes that emerge from monitoring and conferring provide valuable information that inform both you as the teacher and the students as they work to build independence.

Making the Most of Independent Writing Time_Hubbard.pdf

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Looking for more PD on this topic?

Online: This article is one of many available to you with a Digital Library Subscription. Find out more here!

Off-Site: Which authors are coming to your area for one day workshops? Click here to browse the list by region, author, or state.

On-Site: Take a look at school-based seminars, and consulting authors and speakers available to you by clicking here.

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  Betsy Hubbard (@BetsyWrites) Betsy Hubbard is a  kindergarten and first grade teacher. She is a co-author at  the blog Two Writing Teachers and also blogs at I Think in   Poems, Teaching Young Writers, and I’m Living My Words. 

 

Refreshing Your Kids’ Reading and Writing Lives in the New Year

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Written by Anna Gratz Cockerille

The start of a new calendar year brings a sense of renewal, possibility, and novelty.  It is a time for reflection, and certainly, as the number of people who make New Year’s resolutions shows, for goal-setting. 

Hopefully, your students (and you!) have returned from the break rested, recharged, and ready to reinvest. This is the perfect time to channel your students to reflect on their reading and writing lives and to make plans for the year ahead. 

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PLC Series: Uncovering Student Writers

Welcome to a new year of content and conversation in Heinemann's PLC Series. This month we focus on the craft of teaching writers—not the writing.


Take a moment to look around your classroom. You might see pencils on the floor, journals sticking out of desks, and baskets full of notebooks or papers. Now look more closely. Chances are writing is hiding there, words and ideas tucked into the inconspicuous corners of the room.

When you nurture a classroom of writers within a workshop model, you have the opportunity to uncover this hidden writing – writing that students would like to bring to life and can, with a little time and a gentle nudge.

In this clip from a Heinemann PD webinar, educator and author Lisa Eickholdt shares an example of this kind of writing. After you watch the clip, think about this discovery from the young writer in her classroom and consider: What conditions were in place for this student to put the pencil to the page in this way?
 

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Looking for more PD on this topic?

Online: Click here to find out about the webinars planned for 2017 with Lindsey Moses, Lisa Eickholdt & Patty Vitale-Reilly, and more!

Off-Site: Which authors are coming to your area for one day workshops? Click here to browse the list by region, author, or state.

On-Site: Take a look at school-based seminars, and consulting authors and speakers available to you by clicking here.

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Lisa Eickholdt (@LisaEickholdt) has 23 years of experience in the classroom as a primary grades teacher, a Title I teacher, a Reading Recovery teacher, an interventionist, and a literacy coach. Currently, Lisa is an Assistant Professor of Literacy Education at Georgia Gwinnett College and works as a literacy consultant in classrooms nationwide. Her recent book, Learning from Classmates: Using Students' Writing as Mentor Texts, celebrates student writing and promotes student engagement.

 

The Heinemann Podcast: Argument in the Real World

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How can we help students think critically about the community they’re speaking to online while giving them a real voice? How do we help our students create coherent arguments through social media? Kristen Hawley Turner and Troy Hicks say it’s not just about creating a podcast or blog, it’s about building an argument. On today’s podcast we’re hearing from co-authors Kristen Turner and Troy Hicks as they tackle these questions and more in their new book Argument in the Real World: Teaching Adolescents to Read and Write Digital Texts.  

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Students Collaborating in Writing Workshop: Writing Partnerships K-3

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Students Collaborating in Writing Workshop: Writing Partnerships K-3

Written by Anna Gratz Cockerille 

As Lucy Calkins writes in A Guide to the Common Core Writing Workshop, “It’s a great thing in life to find someone who can help you with your writing (p. 48).” Lucy believes this for students, for her colleagues, and certainly, for herself. One only has to read the acknowledgements section in any of Lucy and colleagues' Units of Study books to get a sense of the influence and power of writing partners.  

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PLC Series: Entry Points for Writers

Welcome to a new year of content and conversation in Heinemann's PLC Series. This month we focus on the craft of teaching writers—not the writing.



It is our joyful responsibility as teachers to nurture the writers in our classrooms and to help them build writing identities as young as possible. In his book Engaging Young Writers (Heinemann, 2009), Matt Glover describes the process of giving or following directions to someone’s house as a metaphor for the need for multiple entry points into writing.  He notes that people will be most successful, providing clear directions or arriving easily at their destination, when allowed to use their preferred method such as by landmarks, directional words, or a map. 

In order for us to engage our youngest (or most reluctant) writers in a way that maximizes their energy for writing, we need to provide multiple entry points so they can find a method that feel comfortable to them. Click the image below to view and download a PDF listing the entry points Matt describes throughout his book Engaging Young Writers, one of many full titles available in the Heinemann Digital Library. 
 

glover-entrypoint

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Looking for more PD on this topic?

Online: The Heinemann Digital Library is full of books, articles and video—all for the price of about one book. Find out more about the content available and purchase a subscription by clicking here!

Off-site: Join Matt in for a One Day workshop this Winter or Spring!

On-Site: Take a look at customized seminars, consulting authors and speakers, and residencies available to you by clicking here.

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image001Matt Glover (@MattGlover123) is a well-known educator, author and presenter. With over 20 years’ experience as a teacher and a principal, Matt travels across the country, speaking about how to best nurture writers and support the intellectual growth and development of your students. Matt has authored several books on the topic, including Engaging Young Writers, and has co-authored Already Ready: Nurturing Writers in Preschool and Kindergarten with Katie Wood Ray, and Projecting Possibilities for Writers: The How, What and Why of Designing Units of Study with Mary Alice Berry.