Category Archives: Technology

Take The Heinemann Teacher Tour From Home!

20232849_10154703637846892_8382909063338438088_oOn Saturday, July 29th, Heinemann celebrated its fifth annual teacher tour.  Each year we invite teachers from all over to join us at our home office to learn from our authors, share in thinking and learning together, and tour the historic mill building that we call home. This year, we were pleased to host authors Ralph Fletcher, Grace Kelemanik, Valerie Bang-Jansen, Mark Lubkowitz, and Cornelius Minor. Each author led a forty minute PD workshop session for the tour participants. 

Were you unable to make it to this year's teacher tour? Fear not! We recorded each session LIVE for Facebook, and you can watch all of the videos below, along with the day's tweets and some presenter materials. 

Continue reading

Why is Inquiry Work Good For Kids?

E08990_Daniels_Bookcover_9732

In his most recent book, The Curious Classroom, Harvey “Smokey” Daniels dives deep into the who what where why whens and hows of student-directed inquiry. With each chapter, he lays out the next step in a ten-rung ladder to help you get your class from zero to inquiry as quickly as possible.

We wanted to know more about why student-directed inquiry is good for kids, and what teachers and schools have to gain from this approach to learning, so we asked him! Here’s what he had to say: 

Continue reading

Your One Stop Shop for Recent Podcast Highlights

Heinemann-Podcast_LOGO_H-podcast-logo-bluerules2400x2400_WHITE

Each week on The Heinemann Podcast we bring you concise, relevant and thought-provoking interviews with Heinemann authors and educators in the field. We know teachers are very busy people and it can be hard to keep up with all of your favorite authors, so, as we wrap up another school year we thought you might enjoy a recap of some recent Heinemann Podcast highlights. Enjoy!  

Continue reading

Choosing Effective Tools for Crafting Argument

e08675_turnerhicks_sm

Every day, our students are inundated by information—as well as opinions and misinformation—in the world and on their devices. Digital texts influence what they buy, who they vote for, and what they believe about themselves and their world. Crafting and analyzing arguments in a digital world could be our greatest possibility to improve dialog across cultures and continents… or it could contribute to bitter divides.

Continue reading

Teaching Argument to Support Meaningful Conversation

Argument in the real world_MG5D7729

Every day, our students are inundated by information—as well as opinions and misinformation—in the world and on their devices. Digital texts influence what they buy, who they vote for, and what they believe about themselves and their world. Crafting and analyzing arguments in a digital world could be our greatest possibility to improve dialog across cultures and continents… or it could contribute to bitter divides.

Continue reading

Teaching Argument in the Digital World

photo-1472220625704-91e1462799b2

Adapted from Argument in the Real World: Teaching Adolescents to Read and Write Digital Texts By Kristen Hawley Turner and Troy Hicks


In The Uses of Argument (1958/2003), philosopher and educator Stephen Toulmin dissects syllogistic arguments and concludes, “Most of the arguments we have practical occasion to make use of are, one need hardly say, not of this type” (p. 124). Instead, Toulmin suggests a model for argument that focuses on practical uses and accounts for the complexity of human conversation, where arguments can be nested within each other and challenged at multiple levels—a description that applies to online discourse and digital writing as well. In fact, Toulmin explains that, in real-life situations, people make claims, and a conversational partner may challenge a claim by asking, “What have you got to go on?” (p. 13). This question requires the presentation of what Toulmin calls data and what the Common Core terms evidence.

Continue reading