Category Archives: High School

PLC Series: The Language We Can Gather from Reading More Widely

Welcome to the Heinemann PD Professional Learning Community Series. This month we look closely at the creating opportunities for ourselves and our students to consider the power of the reading-writing connection.

“Read, read, read. Read everything—trash, classics, good and bad, and see how they do it. Just like a carpenter who works as an apprentice and studies the master. Read! You’ll absorb it. Then write. If it is good, you’ll find out.”

—William Faulkner

By Katherine Bomer

The secret to teaching how to write is to read, but that doesn't mean standing in front of the How to Write section in Barnes & Noble and picking a book by an author you’ve never heard of. Instead read what you’re passionate about and then try to widen the scope of that passion, reading different genres, so that you can say you’re passionate about good writing with the confidence that you know what good writing is regardless of genre. Trust in your own responses as a reader—good writing excites you, moves you, gives you clarity, makes you laugh, and makes you realize how deliciously complicated life really is.

Continue reading

The Heinemann Podcast: Cornelius Minor on the Over-Engaged Student

Cornelius3_IMG_6598

When we think about engagement we almost immediately focus on the student who won’t talk or just doesn't engage. But what about the student who is over engaged? On today’s podcast we’re continuing our series of conversations with Cornelius Minor. Today we’re talking about a student he has nicknamed “Prez” short for president of the class. 

Continue reading

Play

Teacher Appreciation: Rachael Gabriel Thanks an Inspiring Educator

Rachael Gabriel reflects on her high school English teacher, who led the class with vision. 

Rachael Gabriel is a coauthor of Making Teacher Evaluation Work.​

 

TAW_1920x1080.video

Continue reading

Teacher Appreciation: Kristen Hawley Turner on the Educators that Inspire Her

Today we have Kristen Hawley Turner giving her thanks and appreciation to the teachers of the Fordham Digital Literacies Collaborative, who are working to make differences in the lives of children every day. 

 

 

 

Kristen Hawley Turner is the coauthor of  Argument in the Real World 


TAW_1920x1080.video

Continue reading

Teacher Appreciation: Georgia Heard Reflects on The Great Advice of a Teacher

Here, Georgia Heard sends out thanks to a special teacher she had while studying at Columbia, who offered some advice that made a world of difference. 

 

 

 

 

 

Georgia Heard is the author of Heart Maps: Helping Students Create and Craft Authentic Writing.


TAW_1920x1080.video

Continue reading

The Discourse Against Homework: Concerns and Solutions

E09281_Collin and Bempechat_Bookcover_9241

Homework. The word alone evokes strong emotions from children, youth, parents, and teachers. For most teachers, this word sits right between rock and hard place. Assign too much homework, and teachers run the risk of complaints, if not outright misery, from parents, students, and—feeling the need to give feedback on all that homework—themselves. Assign too little homework, and teachers risk being seen as “soft” and lacking in rigor, and because homework can feel like it helps “cover” the curriculum, feeling further behind. And that just regards the issue of how much homework. Then there are all the complexities around what kinds of homework.

Continue reading